Category: Butler Banner

A Word from the Roberts Library: Old Acquaintance, Never Forgotten—and a New Year Ahead

I’m always hesitant to wish time away. I try to resist wishing for school to be out, for vacation to be here, for the heat of summer to be over (well, if I’m honest, I usually wish for that). Almost the only time I wish time would pass more quickly is when I’m stuck on an airplane that’s sitting on the tarmac for a couple of hours or when I’m waiting for a really good meal to be ready to eat.


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Prioritizing Arkansas’s History and Heritage: Worth the Effort

I have spent nearly two decades in some capacity or another engaged in matters of Arkansas history and heritage, and while I have absorbed a wealth of scholarship, and produced some of my own, there is one question about the collective soul of Arkansans whose answer continues to elude me:

Why don’t we take ourselves more seriously?


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Capturing Memories Is More Than Just Taking a Picture

When I say you should “capture memories,” what do you think of?

My guess is that you would get out a camera or your smartphone and get ready to take a picture or get a video.

But a picture captures only a still moment in time. And a video is usually reserved for big events like birthdays or Christmas.


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Rare Finds from a Media Goldmine, When You Have the Time to Look

I’m not sure you can find anyone who would dispute the statement that 2020 has been a strange year that has brought many changes to our lives. I certainly would not. For me, some changes have been a little stressful. Early in the pandemic, the Central Arkansas Library System closed down, sending all employees home,


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Art on the Move at CALS Library Square

Fusion, a spherical sculpture made of limestone sitting on a limestone base, was commissioned as a memorial to Vernon C. Johnson Sr., who was a security guard at the Central Arkansas Library System for more than twenty years. After Johnson’s death in 2006, the CALS community commissioned the artwork from sculptor Michael Warrick.


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Immanuel Lutheran Church Records Now Available for Research

Several German communities emerged to the west and southwest of Little Rock in the 1870s and 1880s in response to efforts by the state and by the railroads to promote immigration. These settlements, which still show evidence of their German heritage, continued to use the German language well into the twentieth century. The religious needs of community members were initially served by occasional visits from the pastor of First Lutheran Church in Little Rock.


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The Butler Banner archives between 1999-2018 are available in PDF format only.

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